Italian

Schedoni Frame

Bartolomeo SCHEDONI Holy Family, in frame (auction house photograph)

We were recently asked to do some minor restorations to a frame for this painting by Bartolomeo Schedoni (1578-1615).  The neo-Classical frame is not contemporary with the painting but of exceptional quality.  I think that the frame is Roman? from about 1780/1800.

All the ornament is carved and perfectly gilded.  Particular care has been taken in the gilding and the contrast between flat and burnished areas – just look at the shell-like leaf on the burnished background below!Some two complete rows of ornament was missing – you can see the ‘shadow’ of something that was there in the photo above – we decided not to replace this.


Venetian-lovely-copy,-green.jpg

Venetian early 18C reverse section frame with carved leaf, 15 1/2 x 11″ (39 x 28 cms)

A Venetian frame illustrating what I think of as the ‘sunburst’ effect – ornament radiating out from the painting.  A good example of perfect balance in a frame where the weight of section, scale of the ornament and overall size all seem to fit together perfectly to make an object desirable in its own right.


 

Pastiglia-framea

Italian 15th Century pastiglia frame 9 1/4 x 8″ (23.5 x 20 cms)

 These frames are unusual but seem fairly standard – they are often small and have one of three or four patterns on the slightly convex frieze. They

The ornament is made from pastiglia (literally, pastework) where gesso is modelled.  The material in this example appears quite fibrous, as if gesso had been mixed with paper pulp.


 

Black-and-gold-Cassetta1a

Italian 16C Cassetta frame 25 3/4 x 19″ (65 x 48 cms)

A classic type of frame from Italy, this type of frame is known as cassetta and with the black and gold like this is from the 16th Century.  Note the elegance of the very simple section (a flat piece of wood with added sight and back edge mouldings) which relies for its effect on the balance of the gilded lines and ornament on the black painted areas rather than elaborate carving.

This type of frame is often copied either like this rather elegant example with four lines of gilding or more crudely, often without the back-edge moulding.

Here is another example, smaller and with engraved and punched ornament on the gilded centres and corners.

IMG_1288.jpg

Italian 16C cassetta frame with engraved centres and corners, 15 x 11 1/2″ (38 x 29 cms)

 


Sansovino1a

Interesting Sansovino type frame – the inner part is modern, but the outer carving is late 15th Century and in good condition.  The carving is very elegant, the faces of the caryatids are charming.  Matt blue paint on the background and red lacquer on the gilding for the jewel-like cabochon ornament.


7586

North Italian or Southern French 17 reverse section frame with engraved gilded corners and faux tortoiseshell painted surface, 14 3/4 x 12″ (37.5 x 30.5 cms)

A very elegant small frame with brightly gilded corners against a rather sketchy ‘tortoiseshell’ pattern.  The frame has the ‘hazzling’ (looks like stitching) on the sight and back edges, which is typically French but the pattern and gilding are more Italian.  The gilded line around the sight edge is particularly effective.  The frame is in perfect conditon.

7586-(detail)


7341

Italian 18C Gilded ‘Salvator Rosa’ section frame with original pale blue colour in the hollow, 29 3/4 x 22″ (75.6 x 56 cms)

Very attractive Italian (probably Roman) 18C moulding frame with unusual pale duck-egg blue painted surface in the hollow.  Some damage to the lower edge which  can be repaired.

7341-detail


Roman done up a bit copy

Roman 17C cassetta section frame with carved ornament

 The gilding on this rather architectural Roman is original (a rather lemony colour) but the painted surface has been recreated.  When the frame was bought it was covered all over in bronze paint.


Venetian-Gadrooneda

This small frame is lovely – a sort of  (French) Berain type sight edge, punched frieze (rather Italian) and then bold gadroons with flower heads in between (often a motif of English frames of the early 18C), with a further row of carving behind the gadrooned top edge and a stepped back edge.

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